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The Lonely Sea: Collected Short Stories
Alistair MacLean
Her Benny
Silas K. Hocking
Vedere din Parfumerie
Silvia Kerim
Mysticism and Logic (Western Philosophy)
Bertrand Russell
The Analects of Confucious
Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking
William James
Does Anything Eat Wasps?: And 101 Other Unsettling, Witty Answers to Questions You Never Thought You Wanted to Ask
New Scientists Books Staff, New Scientist
Mutual Aid
Pyotr Kropotkin
City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi
Olivia Fraser, William Dalrymple
The Brothers Karamazov
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism - Max Weber, Michael D. Coe, Talcott Parsons, R.H. Tawney I suspect that a lot of Germans in the 19th century discovered the discursive power of the dialectic, subsequently enthralling audiences with a kind of permanent intellectual suspense for the next century. In Webber's case, he's talking about theology without any of the theological detail contemporary readers might have identified, engaging in obscure arguments with himself, along with theologians no one will ever care to look up, all buried in 100 pages of dialectic footnotes, thankfully, without a lot of theological detail or context.

I got addicted to just sampling the footnote pages for several months, but now that I think about it, maybe I was just consuming a strong, vapid and entertaining spirit, like any good capitalist. Without a shred of recognizable religion or theological interest in me, I am still fascinated by how electric the reading experience was.

Given that he published this short work decades after Marx had already published volume after volume, I also suspect a down-and-dirty German throwdown, where one old capitalist wrestler wrestles himself alone in the ring and thereby attempts to guarantee some victory.